Arranmore Lighthouse From Above

Arranmore Island is the second largest island in Ireland and one in which Irish is the prevalent language although most of the 500 plus people who live there speak both English and Irish. It is a favoured destination for those who like to immerse themselves in Irish culture and is savoured by those who enjoy cliff walks and outdoor pursuits. The lighthouse was the first lighthouse built in the Donegal area and was manned up until 1976. It was first set up to deal with the Atlantic shipping lane and also acted as a World War 2 monitoring post.

RTE Today Visits Kilcar

RTE Reporter Colm Flynn visits Kilcar in Co. Donegal – gateway to the Donegal Gaeltacht, situated between mountain and sea

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Arranmore Lighthouse From Above

Arranmore Lighthouse has been in existence since 1859 having replaced the lighthouse built in 1798 which had been de-commissioned in 1832. It is located at Rinrawros Point.

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Slieve League Cliffs From Above

Slieve League Cliffs (Sliabh Liag), situated on the south west coast of Donegal, are said to be among the highest and finest marine cliffs in Europe.

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Doon Fort Portnoo

Doon Fort is an ancient ring fort on Doon Lough, 9km kilometres north of Ardara and not far from the coastal villages of Narin and Portnoo.

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The Last “King” in Ireland

Toraigh Island is small. It’s got less than 150 inhabitants, one paved road, one church, one grocery store, one hotel and – still – one king. Patsy Dan Rodgers is 71 and became king in 1993.

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Wild Atlantic Way Rock Climbing

Bren Whelan and Wild Atlantic Way Climbing, show case Ireland’s most Northerly Point – Malin Head using dizzy drone footage of Donegal rock climbing!

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Chasing the Northern Lights

Chasing the Northern Lights off the north coast of Ireland has become a pursuit of passion for Donegal’s photographic community.

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The Mill Restaurant Dunfanaghy

A small award winning restaurant with 7 individually decorated bedrooms located along Wild Atlantic way on the outskirts of Dunfanaghy.

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Moville Inishowen Donegal

Moville is located on the banks of Lough Foyle and is only a 30 min drive from the historic city of Derry. One of Donegal’s heritage towns, Moville takes it’s name from the Irish Maghbile, which means “Plain of the Ancient Tree” and refers to the site of an ancient monastery.

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The Bridge to Cruit Island

Cruit is connected to the mainland at Belcruit by a bridge built at the time of World War II, and the bridge, some of the finest beaches in Donegal and the golf course combine to make the island a very popular destination.

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